Merlot Vision

Dark ruby with a black & white edge. Massive conifer and Givenchy nose, hot and brassy, ridiculously concentrated, thick nasal-clogging blackness oozing along on waves of unctuous buttered spice. Decanted heavily.

It’s National Merlot Month or some such horseshit dreamed up by women with 40k Twitter followers who have one look, still hold the bowls of their glasses and mention where they bought the blouse. There’s plenty of men of this ilk too, of course. Naturally, they all do it under the auspices of ‘education’, somehow impressing on their dutiful sheep the rare and exotic experiences this bottle will evoke this holy month other than opening it, oh, say… September 7th or November 9th. Well, I drink a TON of Merlot ALL THE TIME and this isn’t Wine 101. I know I don’t spew on about it like a bum who’s found Christ–but Merlot is probably my favorite red grape–and I don’t need to: it requires no artificial inflation on my part. It’s been King for centuries and real wine people know this and don’t need to dredge an alleged culture-created social downfall in order to prop the long-held qualities of something up. And anyone who does gets an asterisk. So I’m just sitting over here drinking Merlot as usual. Screw your #influencer holiday.

I don’t know how much Merlot is in this, but it’s already doing a pretty classic *fade to grey* in the nose–where all the fruit coagulates into a lush flat bomb. Hey, at least there’s a ton of it still there: THAT is not something every Merlot can say.

In the mouth, holy WOW what a mouthfeel. This thing needs a decade of age. That’s all I’m gonna say. I feel it is pretty hi alcohol–maybe even 14-5 if that’s even POSSIBLE in Bordeaux–so the expectancy beyond 10 years would be iffy. Sharp and bitter and clawing huge gashes of acid and tannin all over your mouth, the still VERY VISIBLE dark cherry, crab-apple and currant nestled at the core. Crazy sharp hi-note tannin take over late-middle, ostentatious show-stoppers you have to experience to believe. Nowhere, though, does the fruit lose a foothold. Detractors (probably from Napa) will point to a thinnish middle where gunpowder graphite reigns. You know what I say to that?

2015 CHATEAU JEAN VOISIN Grand Cru St. Emilion Bordeaux France 14.5

chateaujeanvoisin.fr
lastbottlewines.com

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